Why I Embrace Being Labeled a “Gamer Girl”

Let me just preface this post by saying this: I don’t see myself as a feminist per se though I do find it necessary and appreciate everything it has done and continues to do for womenkind. But I’m not exactly itching to burn my bra in a parade…. That being said, here is why I think female gamers should be celebrated as exactly what they are and not be expected to just blend in with the boys.

According to THEESA.com, 45% of gamers are women but for some reason, closing the gap on the majority has given most of us a pretty terrible reputation. Because, really, why would women want to play games unless they just wanted attention from guys. Maybe it’s because since the dawn of man, really ridiculously good looking women only played video games in the imaginations of male gamers and now they just can’t believe it’s no longer a fantasy.

I remember when Faces of WoW started and I saw that my server was full of actual girls. And they were all hot! Sure, some posted some pretty attention starved photos but those were the ones that were pretty attention starved in-game and in real life as well. It wasn’t too difficult to tell them apart from the rest of the female WoW population since they usually didn’t raid, begged over Ventrillo for gear drops, and had to be rez’d after every mob pull (got aggro lulz sry! i’ll hearts u if u rez me!!). But my server had plenty of hardcore female raiders that earned their dkp with their skills, not their boobs, and they were awesome! I think what I’m getting at is that generalizations are lame and using them makes you pretty lame too. I dated a guy that discouraged me very strongly from posting my picture on Faces of WoW because, in his mind, I would only do it for attention or  even that it would lead to me getting more attention than he wanted. In real life, I guess my anti-social habits put guys off naturally but online I’d get super boy aggro. Who knows. The way I see it is this: I cannot change who I am and I’m certainly not going to hide myself because that doesn’t change anything either.

Thing is, I don’t believe all gamers are created equal. Before you decide to raise a pitchfork and join an angry mob to come get me, hear me out! I don’t think that any person/groups of people are worth less than others. It just seems to me that some times the saying “everyone is created equal” leads to a lot of people holding their hands out expecting things to just be handed to them because they see themselves as equal to the people actually working their butts off. Here’s the truth: I suck at rhythm games. Like hands down terribly “how can anyone be that awful” kind of awful. But I am really good at puzzles in games. Like “yer doing it wrong give me the controller and be filled with shock and awe” kind of good. I believe that sets me apart and that is incredibly liberating.

That is why I love being labeled a gamer girl. And that is why I love being labeled a gaming mom. Because both of those things add to my individualism. I do not strive to be equal to male gamers. I strive to be the absolute best that I can be. And for me, that doesn’t mean blending in or abandoning anything that makes me who I am. But hey, maybe that’s just me!

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6 thoughts on “Why I Embrace Being Labeled a “Gamer Girl”

  1. Thank you, thank you. I also consider myself a gamer girl. I have been reading a succession of gamer blogs written by women complaining about the “gamer girl” label. I just don’t see what’s wrong with it (I mean, *I* don’t have a problem with it…).

    • Exactly! I definitely don’t find it offensive one bit. But I also think it’s great when people disagree with me as well. The world would just be too boring if we all had the same viewpoint I suppose! 🙂

  2. Greetings,

    Purely out of curiosity how do define yourself and your associates in face of a rather established market model that game devleopers follow?

    Sincerely,

    • Hmm that is a really great question but I have to admit I’ve never really thought about this! I’ve read plenty of articles from female game devs, I have friends in the gaming industry and I think at the moment that I’ve embraced the fact that devs really aren’t making games for me and my demographic. But to be totally honest, that doesn’t bother me personally. The industry itself is very male dominant and therefore difficult for them to know exactly what their female buyers actually want. A tad unrelated, but I work for an all female marketing firm and a lot of our brands end up having a feminine feel because that’s who we are. So knowing that, I have a hard time faulting a male heavy industry for not knowing me and what I want. It’s also never bothered me to be forced to play a male character just like as a kid I didn’t mind playing with G.I. Joe. Some of my favorite game characters are male but maybe that’s because when there is a token female character thrown in you can tell the devs just saw her as a quota. But again, I don’t find this oppressive because I still haven’t met a man on this green Earth that understands women 100%. For me, I’d love to see more females in the gaming industry that can change this but that’s possibly a long way off and I’m not going to let it ruin my gaming experience. Ugh, sorry, I tend to ramble but I hope that I’ve answered your question within this TL;DR reply. 🙂
      *edited for spelling errors.

  3. Greetings,

    I think that the reason publishers are not targeting the audience is primarily because there is a new identity being forged by female gamers that makes many male gamers uncomfortable.

    That is subjective however; I look forward to future writings.

    Sincerely,

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